You Need to Read This II

How is it possible that in a matter of days, there is something else about Flannery that you MUST read?

But yes, it is true.

Here are PRAYERS that she wrote in her journal, starting in 1946. Even I, who have read almost everything there is to read about Flannery, have never read these. A taste:

Dear God, tonight it is not disappointing because you have given me a story. Don’t let me ever think, dear God, that I was anything but the instrument for Your story—just like the typewriter was mine. Please let the story, dear God, in its revisions, be made too clear for any false & low interpretation because in it, I am not trying to disparage anybody’s religion although when it was coming out, I didn’t know exactly what I was trying to do or what it was going to mean. – See more at: http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/leithart/2013/09/09/oconnors-prayers/#sthash.nsWgFlRg.36YlIte6.dpuf

I find it intensely interesting that she writes these in the form of letters – almost as if He were another Correspondent among the many in The Habit of Being — though of course, her primary Correspondent.

Read more here:

First Things

The New Yorker

*UPDATE

I cringe though, at her reaction upon discovering that somebody has posted her private journal entries. I think he or she may even have earned a short story out of it – and if you know Flannery, you know what having her write a short story about you would mean…

 

On another note:

Apparently a couple of my new students inadvertently found my blog online, and they were worried that I would be upset. Don’t worry, I’m not! I understand that anything I post on the internet like this is public and thus may be read by anyone … even some of my student’s parents (gasp)! So, hi, guys!

And, to all of my former students who may be reading this blog as well, hello and (clearly) I miss you!

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Catholicism, Fiction, Flannery O'Connor, Literature, Teaching

2 responses to “You Need to Read This II

  1. Ashley

    You wouldn’t happen to have a copy of any of Flannery O’Connor’s work in the classroom library, would you?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s